Disability Futurity

We hope to reschedule the events cancelled due to COVID-19 and will announce new dates in due course.

Disability Futurity 2019-20 Schedule Ottawa Times with COVID-19 Restriction Updates

Disability Futurity: Interdisciplinary Anticipations of a Non-normative Tomorrow.

2019/20 Seminar Schedule

Carleton University’s Disability Research Group (CUDRG) is an interdisciplinary collaboration between the Department of History, School of Social Work, and the Department of Systems and Computer Engineering. The CUDRG is co-hosting this joint seminar series with the Liverpool Hope University Centre for Culture & Disability Studies (CCDS) in Liverpool, UK. Four seminars will take place at Liverpool Hope and four seminars at Carleton, each virtually-attended by the other institution by live videoconference. All Carleton and Liverpool Hope events will take place 617 Southam Hall. All times are listed in the Ottawa time zone

Liverpool Hope: Wednesday, 20 November, 9:00-10:30am
– “Living as if we already know what ‘human’ will be: exploring the anticipated     futures of visual/deaf humanity and how they shape the present”.
– Dr Mike Gulliver, University of Bristol

Carleton: Wednesday, 22 January, 10:30am-12noon
– “Representations of Disability Experience in Live Theatre”.
– Mx seeley quest (sie/hir), Montreal

Liverpool Hope: Wednesday, 5 February, 9:00am-10:30am
– “The role of risk in relation to Special Educational Needs and Disability”.
– Sharon Smith, University of Birmingham

Carleton: Wednesday, 18 March, 10am-11:30am***cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions***
– “Exploring Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in Time: Life, death, and futurity in rehabilitation.”
– Dr. Thomas Abrams, Queen’s University

Carleton: Wednesday, 8 April, 9am-10:30am ***cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions***
– “Spectral Risk and the Future of Disability.”
– Dr. Kelly Fritsch (Carleton University), and Dr. Anne McGuire (University of   Toronto).

Carleton: Monday, 22 June, 9am-10:30am ***cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions***
– “Disability Histories and Futures of the Nation.”
– Dr. Gildas Bregain (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Santé Publique), Dr. Beth Robertson (Carleton University), and Dr. Paul van Trigt (Leiden University).

Updated Dr. Thomas Abrams poster

***Cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions***

 

Exploring Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in time: life, death, and futurity in rehabilitation.
Dr. Thomas Abrams, Queen’s University
With collaboration of Professor David Abbott (University of Bristol) and Bhavnita Mistry, M.A., (Bloorview Research Institute, Toronto).

Date: Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Time: 10:00–11:30am

Place: 617 Southam Hall, Carleton University (live videoconference with Liverpool Hope University, UK.)

All are welcome to join the live event (Zoom Meeting ID 762 129 097) at this link: https://zoom.us/j/762129097

Alison Kafer’s Feminist, Queer, Crip challenges us to “explore disability in time” (Kafer 2013:46), to chart accessible futures for those who have been cast away by oppressive timeframes. In this presentation, and following Kafer’s political-relational model of disability, I chart the life and death timeframes presented in the rehabilitation clinic, focusing on young people diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), their parents, and practitioners. Young people with DMD will, as of current care techniques, live to their 20s and 30s, and much of disease management means addressing decline in muscular function. Following a three-year collaborative ethnography of two DMD clinics (see Setchell et al. 2018), I present a qualitative data-set to take up Kafer’s challenge. This means fighting oppressive understandings of time, quality of life, and temporality deployed in the clinical management of DMD, while also taking seriously the expected trajectory of DMD as a disability issue, as vocalized by the young people interviewed and observed in the clinical space. I end with lessons for accessible futures, for critical rehabilitation sciences, and temporal studies of ability to come.

This seminar is part of the Disability Futurity series organised by the Carleton University Disability Research Group in collaboration with the Liverpool Hope University Centre for Culture & Disability Studies. The seminar presentation in Ottawa will be connected to Liverpool Hope University live through videoconference.

For information about Disability Futurity, please contact Professor David Bolt, boltd@hope.ac.uk.

For information about the Carleton University event, please contact Dr. Ryan Patterson, Ryan.Patterson@carleton.ca

Download the Sharon Smith Seminar Event Poster

The Role of Risk in Relation to Special Educational Needs and Disability
Sharon Smith, PhD Candidate, University of Birmingham

Date: Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Time: 9:00–10:30am

Place: 617 Southam Hall, Carleton University (live videoconference with Liverpool Hope University, UK)

All are welcome to join the live event (Zoom Meeting ID 230 252 634) at this link: https://zoom.us/j/230252634.

Since the 1990s, there has been an increased focus within education on keeping pupils safe, and anticipating risks of problems, such as negative outcomes or future underachievement, resulting in the ‘at risk’ label being applied to some students, who then require greater observation and protection. Students with disabilities are often seen as more vulnerable than the general school population, and therefore are subject to even greater monitoring and risk management than their peers.

This paper will argue that the move within education towards risk management is problematic for disabled students, because they are now subject to disciplinary power over their future, which is calculated and managed. However, the future of the other is not something that should be comprehended in the present, nor should there be any attempt to contain it. Instead, there should be a relationship with the future, based on ‘the temporal transcendence of the present toward the mystery of the future’ (Levinas, 1987:94). This paper therefore discusses an alternative conception of teaching and learning for students with disabilities, where the educator puts themselves in a ‘position to receive and welcome’ the other in their alterity, which defies any limits that may be imposed on them (Todd, 2011:174-5).

Levinas, E. (1987) Time and The Other [and additional essays]. Trans. by R.A. Cohen. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press.

Todd, S. (2011) Welcoming and Difficult Learning. In: Egéa-Kuehne, D. (ed.) Levinas and Education: At the Intersection of Faith and Reason. London: Routledge, 170-185.

This seminar is part of the Disability Futurity series organised by the CCDS in collaboration with Carleton University’s Disability Research Group. The seminar presentation in Liverpool will be connected live by videoconference.

For information about Disability Futurity, please contact Professor David Bolt, boltd@hope.ac.uk.

For information about the Carleton University event, please contact Dr. Ryan Patterson, Ryan.Patterson@carleton.ca

Representations of Disability Experience in Live Theatre
Mx seeley quest, Montreal

Date: Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Time: 10:30am–12:00noon

Place: 617 Southam Hall, Carleton University (live videoconference with Liverpool Hope University, UK.)

Representation of disability experience in live theatre, outcomes of work initiated by disabled art makers, and of practicing transparent communication with mixed audiences, using research-creation processes with two script projects of mine in development. This series created collaboratively with the public will also require representing accessibility accommodations with minimized carbon footprints, including enacting that in the project production, another key aspect of disability futurity.

One has contemporary setting, features two physically disabled characters, negotiating power dynamics as photographer and model, raising questions of exposure, desire, consent–and of negotiating power as a physically and cognitively disabled playwright with performers and audience, in decisions about what kinds of disabilities and experiences to represent, and authenticity versus artifice.  The characters don’t have assigned genders, and collaborating in different gendered pairings through workshops and productions’ castings, navigating gendered and sexual tensions along with variable embodiments, is a phenomenon part of disability futurity.

The other script is set in Montreal fifteen years in the future, not centering crips as much, yet the radio drama serial will have a majority of disabled actors and production crew, and feature crip characters in this future world daily contributing to life in ecologically-remade communities.

This seminar is part of the Disability Futurity series organised by the Carleton University Disability Research Group in collaboration with the Liverpool Hope University Centre for Culture & Disability Studies. The seminar presentation in Ottawa will be connected to Liverpool Hope University live through videoconference.

For information about Disability Futurity, please contact Professor David Bolt, boltd@hope.ac.uk.

For information about the Carleton University event, please contact Dr. Ryan Patterson, Ryan.Patterson@carleton.ca

Living as if we already know what ‘human’ will be: Exploring the anticipated futures of visual/deaf humanity and how they shape the present.
Dr. Mike Gulliver, Senior Research Associate, University of Bristol

Date: Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Time: 9:00–10:30am

Place: 617 Southam Hall, Carleton University (live videoconference with Liverpool Hope University, UK.)

The hope that “… [we] need not accept our limitations, but can transcend disability through technological innovation” (Herr 2014) is a key tenet of the Posthuman vision. For deaf people, this aspiration already shapes the present. With technologies to restore damaged hearing or prevent damage from occurring in the first place, commentators refer now to a ‘post-deaf’ reality (Davis 2008). A post-deaf world would be celebrated by many. However, for some deaf people—those who see themselves not as disabled, but as a ‘people of the eye’ (Veditz 1910), and who celebrate their natural, sign languages and their unique, signed cultures as the global heritage of a ‘visual form of humanity’ (Bahan 2011)—post-deafness represents not progress, but rather a narrowing of humanity towards a less diverse, less creative, less… ‘human’ future.

Even as the idealism of post-deafness is challenged, however, its inevitability is already being anticipated by present-day policy makers. As it becomes common to assume that technologies are now available to help deaf people choose to become ‘hearing and speaking’ people, alternatives to a post-deaf reality become more and more difficult to imagine. This seminar explores anticipated post-deafness, to uncover how future visions of disability (both real and imagined) shape the present, and the tension between our agency to keep the future open, and the inertia of the ‘inevitable’.

This seminar is part of the Disability Futurity series organised by the CCDS in collaboration with Carleton University’s Disability Research Group. The seminar presentation in Liverpool will be connected live by videoconference.

For information about Disability Futurity, please contact Professor David Bolt, boltd@hope.ac.uk.

For information about the Carleton University event, please contact Dr. Ryan Patterson, Ryan.Patterson@carleton.ca